New Garage Build

for any non Lotus car talk or projects.
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kevinbe111 wrote: Mon May 24, 2021 7:10 pm Thanks for sharing the photos Graeme, you’ve got the best of both worlds having a pit and 4-post lift. Would you recommend SJR lifts, I’m considering getting one from them?

Loving the massive Lotus sign in the background! thumbup:
I would. It's their 'Model 1', which is essentially a parking lift. It was inexpensive , I've had it 5 years and it hasn't missed a beat.

A local firm got the contract to do the Geneva motorshow Lotus stand. The wife was driving past their parking area and they were chucking them all away. I have two of those big signs and a fanatstic artist's picture on canvas of the 'Bahar 5'.
Graeme
Ste
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Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 7:06 am

Looks great Kevin. I'm slightly further along than you, but not much. Mine's a similar size too. Not quite as wide but a few metres longer.

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I now have doors on and am about to start on spec'ing the inside.
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kevinbe111
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Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2015 8:14 pm
Location: York

Nice space there Ste, loving that van too :thumbup:

Minor progress update; Green Oak Veranda is almost complete (200x200 Columns on Limestone Staddle Stones). Think I’ll just leave the oak untreated for a more natural silvered/weathered appearance! Roof tiles and Velux’ to go on next week before the slab is poured.

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andybond
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Looks awesome. Love the wood.
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thommo
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Location: Lancs

Wow! Quality job.
Exige S1 No: 139
tlracer
Posts: 676
Joined: Mon May 26, 2003 11:00 am

Definitely liking the verandah 👍

I'd like to add something similar to mine, but the roof pitch is steeper so it would end up a lot narrower...not so much a verandah as a kerbstone with ideas!

I'm interested why the slab isn't being poured until the end - my builder had it down straight after the foundations, then started the walls.
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kevinbe111
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Location: York

The original plan was to pour the slab earlier in the year (after pouring the footings, laying foundation blocks and getting the engineering bricks up to DPC level), but due to constant bad weather at the time we just decided to wait until a better opportunity later in the build. The amount of times the builders discussed the possibility laying the slab ‘next week’ has been a bit of theme over the past 6-months. :lolno:

Not sure if I’ve already mentioned this, but the slab will be built on a layer of Hardcore, Sand, DP Membrane, Insulation (130-150mm) & Steel Reinforced Concrete (150mm).

Final finish yet to be decided. I’m currently leaning towards porcelain floor tiles, but may go with Epoxy Resin.
tlracer
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Joined: Mon May 26, 2003 11:00 am

Mine is pva-bonded then 17mm HD neoprene tiles. Compared to the bare floor these are an impressive insulation barrier and have the added benefits that:

a) They are comfortable to kneel/lie on when working
b) They absorb impacts so if you drop anything it is less likely to be damaged

Also they are good to stop flats forming on soft tyres 👍
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kevinbe111
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Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2015 8:14 pm
Location: York

Are those the garage specific floor tiles or gym type? Interested to see what make/type you’ve got and how they are performing. I can see the benefits, just concerned over moisture getting trapped underneath them and long term durability etc. Although I’m probably over thinking things as usual! :lol:
tlracer
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Joined: Mon May 26, 2003 11:00 am

They're the gym-type, but thicker than the more usually available ones. I bought them originally when the garage was being built - I'd had to put my car in a friend's barn as I'd been ejected from my old garage by the new neighbours who owned it.

The barn was dry but condensation was a problem, even with an Airflow-type 'tent', which I put down to lack of air movement under the car and a very cold concrete floor.

The tiles were an attempt to eliminate the condensation and did the job fantastically. The thermal barrier on the cold floor solved the issue immediately so, once the new garage was completed, the tiles moved with the car!

In use they don't mark up, are easy to keep clean and - unlike the 'grid' ones - they have no holes for dust, dirt and losing washers into.

Any liquid spills haven't been a problem either - they seem to soak up very little even if it's on the 'jigsaw' joins - and anything that seeps through is dealt with easily by simply lifting the relevant tiles for cleaning/drying.
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